Maria Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos-Recto (born Maria Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos November 3, 1953 in Bamban, Tarlac), commonly known as Vilma Santos-Recto or Ate Vi is a Filipino actress and box office queen for almost four decades. One of the original Philippine movie queens, she rose up to become the versatile actress that has been given the fitting title of “Star for All Seasons” because of her capacity to adapt to the changing mores and values of the Filipino woman, giving a face to their plight and struggles, albeit in success both critically and box-office wise in some of Philippine cinema’s classics such as Trudis Liit (1963), Lipad, Darna, Lipad (1973), Burlesk Queen (1977), Relasyon (1982), Sister Stella L. (1984), Alyas Baby Tsina (1984), Pahiram ng Isang Umaga (1989), Dahil Mahal Kita: The Dolzura Cortez Story (1993), Anak (2000) and Dekada ’70 (2002). She is currently the governor of Batangas, Philippines (2012)(Wikipedia).

For More Informations, Visit: Vilma Santos-Recto's Official Web-site

Monday, January 6, 2014

BATA BATA PAANO KA GINAWA (1998)

“Namputang Itlog yan, gawing mong manok!” - Leah

“Sister nain-love ka na ba? Hindi yong Love kay Kristo ha, yong love na may sex!” - Leah


Basic Information: Direction: Chito S. Roño; Adapted screenplay: Lualhati Bautista, Chito S. Roño; Original screenplay: Lualhati Bautista; Cast: Vilma Santos, Albert Martinez, Carlo Aquino, Serena Dalrymple, Angel Aquino, Cherry Pie Picache, Raymond Bagatsing, Ariel Rivera, Rosemarie Gil, Andrea Del Rosario, Dexter Doria, Cita Astals, Ronalissa Cheng, Carmen Serafin; Original Music: Jessie Lasaten; Cinematography: Charlie Peralta; Editing: Jaime Davila; Production Design: Manny Morfe; Sound: Albert Michael Idioma; Theme Song: "Kumusta Ka" performed by Nonoy Zuniga; "Buchik-ik" written and performed by Yoyoy Villame; Producer: Trina N. Dayrit, Charo Santos-Concio, Malou N. Santos

Plot Description: Lualhati Bautista's award-winning novel was adapted to the big-screen with brilliant results: the casting (specially Mayor Vilma Santos as the strong-willed Leah Bustamante) is perfect; Bautista's script is filled with comic and dramatic undertones. 8 year-old Serena Dalrymple provided most of the laughs as the innocent child who serves as Leah's mirror of her personality. Everything in the film is a labor of love and art, and it deserves to be a classic. – IMDB

A fiercely independent and unflinchingly candid woman connected with a women's crisis and survival center has to raise her two kids with different fathers. Her first husband has left her when their career options failed to converge. She is now stuck in an extramarital arrangement with another man who cannot bring himself to respect and commit to their quite unorthodox relationship. – Database of Philippine Movies

The movie is about Lea, a mother of two kids with different fathers. Lea, works in an NGO (non-government organization), which deals with human rights violation committed against women. Ogie and Maya are Lea's children. Ogie's father, Raffy, leaves them when he had to work in the province of Surigao. Lea together with his son Ogie, did not join Raffy for Lea has a job in Manila which she did not want to leave. Maya, whose father is Ding lives with them, together with Ogie. Things start to get worse when Raffy arrives in Manila. Raffy, meets with Lea for him to see his son, Ogie. As days went on, Ogie regularly sees his father and sometimes spends some time in his house together with his new wife who is pregnant with there first child. Raffy, realizes that he has a lot of shortcomings as a father to Ogie. Raffy tells Lea that he will take Ogie with him to the United States after his wife gives birth. Lea doesn't know what to do. – Skynet

Film Achievements: 1999 Brussels International Festival of Independent Films: Best Actress - Vilma Santos, Best Director - Chito S. Roño; Asia-Pacific Film Festival Special Jury Award - Chito S. Roño; FAMAS: Best Child Actor - Carlo Aquino, Best Child Actress - Serena Dalrymple, Best Story - Lualhati Bautista; FAP: Best Actress - Vilma Santos, Best Picture - Star Cinema, Best Supporting Actor - Carlo Aquino, Best Supporting Actress - Serena Dalrymple: Gawad Urian: Best Actress - Vilma Santos, Best Picture - Star Cinema, Best Best Screenplay - Lualhati Bautista, Best Supporting Actress - Serena Dalrymple; Star Awards: Actress of the Year - Vilma Santos, Child Performer of the Year - Carlo Aquino, New Movie Actress of the Year - Serena Dalrymple; Young Critics Circle: Best Film - Star Cinema, Best Performer - Vilma Santos, Best Screenplay - Lualhati Bautista, PASADO: Best Picture - Star Cinema, Best Screenplay - Lualhati Bautista, Best Actress - Vilma Santos

Other Film Achievements: FAP: Best Cinematography nomination - Charlie Peralta, Best Director nomination - Chito S. Roño, Best Editing nomination - Jaime Davila, Best Production Design nomination - Manny Morfe, Best Screenplay nomination - Lualhati Bautista, Best Supporting Actor nomination - Albert Martinez; Gawad Urian: Best Best Director nomination - Chito S. Roño, Best Best Editing nomination - Jaime Davila, Best Music nomination - Jessie Lasaten, Best Sound nomination - Albert Michael Idioma, Best Supporting Actor nomination - Carlo Aquino, Best Supporting Actor nomination - Raymond Bagatsing; Bata Bata Paano Ka Ginawa? Became a stage play in 1999

Film Reviews: Motherhood. Womanhood. It has long been believed that the former is the be-all and end-all of the latter. Our culture dictates this. Our society has its own standard boxes of what constitutes a good woman and of what necessitates a good mother. If you don’t fit this box, then you suffer the consequences. LEA BUSTAMANTE (Vilma Santos), a mother of two and a woman who chooses to live differently, is learning how to deal with these consequences. Her eldest is OJIE (Carlo Aquino), an outspoken boy on his peak of puberty. Her youngest is MAYA (Serena Dalrymple), a precocious and equally outspoken six-year old. Both have different fathers. Neither is married to Lea. Lea was once married to Ojie’s father, RAFFY (Ariel Rivera). But he had to leave for his job and she had to stay for hers. Hence, they separated. Now, Lea lives with Maya’s father, DING (Albert Martinez), a mama’s boy who is constantly at the beck and call of his mother. This infuriates Lea because it reminds her that Ding is not married to her and they are not his priority. Nevertheless, Lea is sure she can handle herself and her children without anyone’s help.

Her world gets shaken however when Raffy goes back to the Philippines. She knows she still loves him but that there is no chance for a reconciliation. Raffy came back with a new wife on the family way. Ojie begins to see his father during weekends. Lea sees how father and son thirst for the bond they should have started forming a long time ago. She also sees how much Maya misses her brother so much whenever he spends his time with his father. Matters get worse when Raffy voices his desire to take Ojie with him and his new wife to America. With a fearful heart and a great respect for her son, Lea leaves the decision to Ojie. Before he even makes a decision, he and Maya suffer an accident. The mother gets blamed. Her job gets blamed. Lea works in a survival center for women in crisis and is continually exposed to the adverse effects of how society can become a victim of its own ideology. Lea considers herself emancipated from these labels. She has her own sense of motherhood, of womanhood, of what is true and good and beautiful. But now, she is being accused by both fathers of not being a good mother, and of being a woman of twisted priorities. In this susceptible state, Lea finds solace in the company of Johnny (Raymond Bagatsing), a colleague and a friend from the center. As if her life wasn’t complicated enough, she receives yet another bomb. Ding breaks up with her after a long absence, apparently after getting married to a girl he got pregnant. Ding wants to take Maya too. With a broken spirit, a confused heart and great reverence for Maya as with Ojie, Lea lets her children decide about their life. In these moments of vulnerability, Lea confronts her worth and the needs of her soul which the men in her life never really fulfilled - her being a woman and a mother. Is living the life she wants worth losing the children she loves? With a broken spirit, a confused heart and great reverence for Maya as with Ojie, Lea lets her children decide about their life. In these moments of vulnerability, Lea confronts her worth and the needs of her soul which the men in her life never really fulfilled - her being a woman and a mother. Is living the life she wants worth losing the children she loves? – Star Cinema

The movie "Bata Bata Paano Ka Ginawa?" is a movie which deals not only with the pains a mother and a wife goes through but also with the people around her as well. The movie which was originally based on the novel of the same title written by Lualhati Bautista, is such a wonderful story. Though it was written during the 1980's, the material still hasn't lost it's appeal and connection to the people, considering that were almost entering the new millenium. What fascinates about the movie is that it did not only revolve around Lea but with the other characters as well. I really felt that all of the actors and actreses in the movie connected with one another. Each of the actors and actresses in the movie had a different story to tell. The movie would not have been as wonderful as it is, had it not been for the stellar performances given by the actors and actresses in the movie. There would be no question in terms of Vilma Santos' acting prowess. Indeed she has proven be one of the fine actreses this country could ever had. I believe that nobody could ever give justice to the role of Lea had it been portryed by another actress other than Vilma Santos. Most noticeable were the performances given by the two kids. Serena Dalrymple and Carlo Aquino's performance were just unbelievable. Considering that the two kids' age and considering that there just neophytes in the acting scene. – Skynet

"A fiercely independent and unflinchingly candid woman connected with a women's crisis and survival center has to raise her two kids with different fathers. Her first husband has left her when their career options failed to converge. She is now stuck in an extramarital arrangement with another man who cannot bring himself to respect and commit to their quite unorthodox relationship. - Databases of Philippine Movies (READ MORE)

"A women's rights activist and mother of two, Lea has been abandoned by the fathers of her children. Her daughter and son are at crucial transitional ages and she struggles to provide for them while maintaining her hectic job at a woman's crisis center. Soon though, the job and her budding romance with co-worker Johnny threaten Lea's role as mother when her children's fathers return to accuse her of neglect." - Baseline Studio Systems (READ MORE)

"The movie "Bata Bata Paano Ka Ginawa?" is a movie which deals not only with the pains a mother and a wife goes through but also with the people around her as well. The movie which was originally based on the novel of the same title written by Lualhati Bautista, is such a wonderful story. Though it was written during the 1980's, the material still hasn't lost it's appeal and connection to the people, considering that were almost entering the new millenium. What fascinates about the movie is that it did not only revolve around Lea but with the other characters as well. I really felt that all of the actors and actreses in the movie connected with one another. Each of the actors and actresses in the movie had a different story to tell. The movie would not have been as wonderful as it is, had it not been for the stellar performances given by the actors and actresses in the movie. There would be no question in terms of Vilma Santos' acting prowess. Indeed she has proven be one of the fine actreses this country could ever had. I believe that nobody could ever give justice to the role of Lea had it been portryed by another actress other than Vilma Santos. Most noticeable were the performances given by the two kids. Serena Dalrymple and Carlo Aquino's performance were just unbelievable. Considering that the two kids' age and considering that there just neophytes in the acting scene." - Skyinet (READ MORE)

"In one of the most remarkable performances in Filipino film history, Vilma Santos plays Lea, a woman who defiantly rejects social convention to experience life on her own terms. A woman's rights activist and mother of two, Lea has been abandoned by the fathers of her children. Her daughter and son are at crucial, transitional ages and she struggles to provide for them while maintaining her hectic job at a women's crisis center. Soon, however, the job and her budding romance with co-worker Johnny threaten Lea's role as mother. When the children's fathers turn up to accuse her of neglect, she must ask herself whether her independence is worth the possibility of losing her children? What role--motherhood or lover--will best satisfy the deepest needs of her soul?" - The 35th Chicago International Film Festival (READ MORE)

"...Lea's Story, based on Lualhati Bautista's award-winning novel "Bata, bata paano ka ginawa," tells the story of Lea, a strong and independent woman who defiantly rejects social conventions to live life on her own terms. Lea, a woman's rights activist and single mother of two, struggles desperately to provide for her children by working at a woman's crisis center. Soon her job and romance with a co-worker are threatened when her estranged husband comes back into Lea's life, accusing her of neglect and abuse. Last year, Lea's Story swept the Filipino Academy Awards by winning Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Screenplay and Best Director. It stars the Philippines' top actress and actor, Vilma Santos and Raymond Bagatsing respectively..." - Asian American Film News (READ MORE)

"...As much as people think that this is Vilma Santos' movie, I beg to disagree. Me thinks it was the children's show. Serena Dalrymple and Carlo Aquino gave two of the best child acting performances ever. Serena as Maya was a chatty young kid, whose bluntness, frankness, and honesty come across as cute and comical however one can still question as to how she was brought up. Carlo Aquino's Ojie is a more mature kid, he understood what was going on and was rebelling to the fucked-up-ness of their situation. What pisses me off is that today, there hardly is a movie that Carlo Aquino is in, except maybe for last year's "Carnivore, "where he was superb in again. Aquino is one of the few great young actors of his time that still is a great actor up to know. He is just not that present anymore. And I kinda wish that he makes more movies, because I know that he is a superb actor..." - Douglas Racso (READ MORE)

"...Nora’s performance in ‘Sidhi” is touted to be the answer to Vilma Santos’ hysterical outing in “Bata, Bata, Pa’no Ka Ginawa?’ If only ‘Sidhi’ came out during last year’s cut-off period, then Nora would definitely give Vilma another tough fight in the awards derby this year. “Let’s stop it,” Ate Guy shakes her head as she shows her lack of interest in the rivalry. “As far as we’re concerned, things like that, you know, that phase is over. Let’s not talk about those things anymore.” Nora knows her rivalry with Vilma would linger for a long time. But personally, she thinks they have developed a different level of friendship through the years. “Movie projects offered to Vilma are different from those I accept. So you really can’t accept films just to compete with her. If I don’t want something, I won’t do it,” Nora further explains..." - Peoples Journal, 1999 (READ MORE)

"...A free-spirited woman and madre de familia runs her life and raises her children unconventionally. It is one of the best films that espouses feminism without being didactic and self-righteous. Humorous, poignant and insightful, it features a yet-another dazzling performance by Vilma Santos..." - Mario A. Hernando (READ MORE)





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